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20130326
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
and cass on ensues, that you have hezbollah there, you have al qaeda, you have some hamas elements there, and you have lots of chemical weapons and lots of very sophisticated conventional weapons that will be up for grabs. and that chaos will cause huge problem for the middle east, for southern europe, and i argue, for the unit stat. member,hese are sophisticated weapons system would make libya look like an antique gun show when all of those weapons spread across north africa. dangerous, destabilizing stuff. >> rose: we continue with a an analysis from richard haas of council on foreign relations, and joshua landis of the university of oklahoma. >> desperate leaders might do desperate things if they felt there was no alternative. i don'i don't think we can prevent the use unless we thaten, i if they are used on any significant scale, what do we do then? >> rose: we conclude with a look at the press conference pie the chairman of the federal reserve, ben bernanke. my guests alan blinder and david leonhardt. >> the most interesting part of the news conference was when bernanke was asked if
and there is a huge vacuum and chaos ensues, that you have hezbollah there. you have akd. al qaeda. you have some hamas elements there and you have lots of chemical weapons and lots of very sophisticate conventional weapons that will be up for grabs. and that chaos will cause huge trouble for the middle east, for southern europe, and i argue for the united states. remember, these are sophisticated weapon systems, would make libya look like an antique gun show when all of those weapons spread across north africa, really dangerous, destabilizing stuff. all of these things have to happen at the same time. i would like to see a safe zone with a no-fly zone so you can train and vet soldiers who have u.s. training to reengage in the battlefield, and prevent the use of those scud missiles. we have the capability t to do all of that. no big boots on the ground. no major military involvement, i think at the end of the day it would service our purpose. >> rose: i think you know there is a debate whether you can do this without boots on the ground. clearly, there are military possibilities of using air powe
and conventional weapons. you have refugee problems on the turkish border. the al qaeda/hezbollah action in syria is very, very concerning to recognize terrorist organizations. this is real trouble real quick. if you want a diplomatic solution -- and i still think there's one possible -- you can't do it if you have no credibility with the opposition and no credibility with our arab league partners. and right now we find ourselves in that spot. so you have to build that credibility. this is not boots on the ground, by the way. i want to make that very clear, we don't need 101st airborne division showing up. >> when you said boots on the groupd, am i wrong? i thought you said over the weekend that you joined in with senator mccain and senator levin, and you want some kind of special forces to go in with syria to identify, locate, or somehow get the chemical weapons back. hence i call that boots on the ground. >> i think it's really important to be clear about what we're trying to do here. we have small groups, special capability forces that we can add to the mix here that does t doesn't -- is not
with respect to israel's growing challenges on its borders, particularly in lebanon with hezbollah in the south with gaza and egypt and, of course, with syria. the last thing that the united states wants is for netanyahu and the israeli people the belief that the president does not have his back and they would have to act unilaterally without due american consultation with israelis. >> and we know, michael, that the president is going to be going to ramallah to be talking to president mahmoud abbas. talked to one palestinian legislator who laid out conditions for returning to the negotiating table. either israel puts a six month freeze on the building in the west bank and they don't pursue international criminal court, or they come to some agreement on borders along the pre-1967 lines. do you see in any of this any hope for progress? >> well, unfortunately, not much, chris. i don't think that israel or frankly the united states are going to go along with those preconditions. and i think the only way negotiations are going to get restarted is if they're unconditional. and you know, one thing we
, chemical weapons and others, will fall into the hands of extremist groups like hezbollah or al qaeda. imagine if those sort of hard-line terrorist groups were to get their hands on chemical weapons. >> well, do you feel, though, at this point, that they have been used based on what we're hearing yesterday and does your intelligence tell you that they are now in play? >> we're being cautious like the u.s. government. we haven't addressed that issue publicly yet. we might soon. but the concern has been there for a very long time. you have a regime that is falling apart. a brutal regime which is apparently on its last leg, that is fighting for its life. you have on the ground in syria, on the side supporting assad you have groups like the iranian revolutionary guard on the ground with the assad regime. you have lebanese hezbollah on the ground with the assad regime. on the opposition side, you've got some actors that are also very problematic groups affiliated with al qaeda. and as we see syria fragment if we're going to see the linkup between these sort of extremist groups and weapons
missiles from hamas and hezbollah in the northern part of the country. iron dome battery is financed by the united states. u.s. put $300 million in this. it is one of things president obama is doing to show his support for israel. he has a speech nationally televised to about a thousand college students. that comes tomorrow. you can expect him to do a direct sell to the israeli people what are the ideas for the country and middle east going forward. why that is the right thing. during his first term the israeli people large lay thought president obama ignored them. you will a lot of one-on-one salesmanship going forward. my grandmother used to say not what you say but how you say it. this is how you say it trip. martha: that is great advice from your grandmother. they were trying to say it very, very well at the initial meeting, it was he have evident. leland, thank you very much. bill: remarkable, martha when you look at the geography for the country of israel. here is the region here. lebanon to the north. israel down here. what we wanted to show you the threat the israelis live wi
'd be concerned that chemical weapons could get to their enemies, hezbollah, in lebanon. but beyond that, ashleigh, you asked if this would overtake iran as a concern, and the answer is no. because this trip for the president is largely about israel's security broadly. and the u.s. assuring israelis that the president stands for keeping israel safe, and when it comes to security, there is no bigger concern in israel than iran getting a nuclear weapon or nuclear capability, so that will always be the number one issue on the agenda and syria now will compete for some attention as well. >> well, with a busy agenda, you're going to be following this, the president. we are watching live. this was scheduled to start any moment now, the president, shimon peres, and also our united states president, president obama, scheduled to speak any moment. we'll wring it to you live the moment it does happen. chief white house correspondent, jessica yellin, thank you for that. >>> when it comes to difficult and challenging jobs, being the director of a prison is certainly near the top of the list. and you can bet t
. you have thousands now of al qaeda fighters joining the fight here and hezbollah. you have chemical weapons at stake and veconventional weapon at stake. we're one of the few nations with the capability to train people. it's about small groups, special capabilities, so that you leverage our credibility so we can get a diplomatic solution and secure those weapon systems. that's a good day for america, but you have to make the decision to move forward. again, i think indecision here at this point, given the way we see what's happening on the ground, is dangerous for our national security. >> worth pointing out again, some 70,000 people have been killed as this fight has continued on. chairman rogers, great to see you, thank you so much. we'll continue talking about this very important issue. >> thanks, kate, and welcome back. >>> the last time prince harry visited the u.s., he ended up needing to explain some scandalous nude pictures taken in las vegas. well, he's just scheduled another u.s. visit. find out where he is and isn't going. coming up next. acceler-rental. at a hertz express
's not about shiite and sunni and hezbollah. i think the real urgent issue i think they have to move forward because we are witness to a great tragedy in that part of the world. >> but, alex, it always turns back to the united states. afghanistan, after 9/11. iraq when, you know, a lot of our allies, other than french, the french were saying, got weapons of mass destruction we have to do about it now in syria. do we continue to exist in the middle of an international order where nothing is done unless it's kids from kansas and california and upstate new york and florida that do the fighting? >> yeah. i think this is one of those moments where, i think, you can almost sense the internal conflict in the white house giving the agagenocide. i don't know how the president will commit any troops given the state of affair of our troops when they return home, 600,000 veterans are stale waiting for their claims to send more boys and women, men and women over there. it would not seem to be any actual support for that. at the same time, how do you reconcile that with the blood shed? 70,000 people are d
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)